clutch2 

What does it mean to be Clutch?

To be Clutch means the ability to do what you can normally do under immense pressure.

Paul Sullivan describes 5 key traits:

1. Focus– Foundation for any clutch performance. It is the basis on which the other traits of pressure performers are built.
2. Discipline: Discipline is almost always a battle against yourself.
3. Adaptability: Adapting to any possible scenario and keeping an eye on the end result.
4. Ability to be Present: The ability to respond to anything that comes your way. being present is a learned behavior. It is partly the result of the first three traits: Focus, Discipline and adaptability. It is a heightened awareness that prepares you to respond.
5. Fear and Desire: Forces of fear and desire are also remarkable factors in helping someone make crucial decisions under pressure. These two forces form the 5th key trait to make people clutch. The fear of something less desirable provides great motivation under pressure. This combination of fear and desire allows them to be clutch when someone motivated by just one of these emotions might fold.

How to Be Clutch with Your Money

“Money is the most powerful secular force in the world,” Brad Klontz, financial psychologist and author of Mind Over Money, said. “Money is linked to everything— safety, health, relationships, creativity and spontaneity, social belonging. It’s the one thing that intersects world,” Brad Klontz, financial psychologist and author of Mind Over Money, said. “Money is linked to everything
— safety, health, relationships, creativity and spontaneity, social belonging. It’s the one thing that intersects
everything, and as soon as I’m talking about money, all
the family dynamics come out.”
Here are the steps you need to take if the pressure you face is financial:
Accept. The first step to getting out of a tough
financial bind is to admit that you’re in one

Psychologically Readjust. The faster this happens
the better. You have to become aware of the feelings
you’re having about your money. In a crisis, it
may be gone and that’s not good. But obsessing
about it is not going to make it come back.

Prioritize. Once you have come to terms with
what has to be done, you have to decide how to
divide things up: What do you need, what do you
want to keep and what needs to go immediately?
Getting rid of what you can’t afford in a crisis will
go a long way to bettering your financial position.

Take Responsibility. No one made you buy a
house or anything else you could not afford.
Regardless of what kind of deal or incomprehensible
mortgage you were offered, the ultimate responsibility
lies with you.

Focus on the Outcome. You want to live to fight
another day. Your goal is not to sell one thing to
buy another. Your goal is to shore up your personal
balance sheet. Once you have restructured your cash
flow, you will be better positioned to make money
decisions under less pressure.

Once you have restructured your cash flow you will be better positioned to make money decisions under less pressure. Ultimately, being clutch in a personal financial crisis means embracing thriftiness to keep yourself out of such crises in the first place.